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Election Statistics for 2019

Now that the 2019 election is over, we’re happy to share with you our voter turnout statistics!

For the 2019 Election, we had 9939 total eligible voters. Of those, 2234 voters cast a ballot, which represents 22.5% of the potential voters. We’re proud to say that our voter turnout is higher than that of last year, which had a turnout of 14.6%. We also saw an increase in the number of ballots cast, from 827 to 2234, which represents a 270% increase and gives us the highest turnout we’ve ever had!

Elections is committed to continuing to reach out to our eligible members to encourage them to vote in elections. Whoever is elected to the Board of Directors can have an important influence on the long-term health of the OTW’s projects, and we want our members to have a say in that. Read More

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AO3 Wins 2019 Hugo Award for Best Related Work

The Organization for Transformative Works is excited to announce that the Archive of Our Own has won the 2019 Hugo Award in the category of Best Related Work! This is the first time an OTW project has won — or been a finalist for — a Hugo Award!

The award was given on August 18, 2019, as part of Dublin 2019: an Irish Worldcon, the 77th World Science Fiction Convention. You can check out detailed results for all award categories on the Worldcon website.

Naomi Novik, one of AO3’s founders, gave a speech as she and other OTW personnel accepted the award, and she gave everyone in the AO3 community a well deserved thank you: Read More

OTW Guest Post

OTW Guest Post: Naomi Jacobs

From time to time, the OTW will be hosting guest posts on our OTW News accounts. These guests will be providing an outside perspective on the OTW or aspects of fandom where our projects may have a presence. The posts express each author’s personal views and do not necessarily reflect the views of the OTW or constitute OTW policy. We welcome suggestions from fans for future guest posts, which can be left as a comment here or by contacting us directly.

Naomi Jacobs is an interdisciplinary Research Fellow, whose work looks at how technology and society interact. In addition to her purely academic writing, she has also co-written two books in the Black Archive series, which takes critical looks at individual episodes of Doctor Who. The second of these (on Kerblam!) is due to be released in November 2019. Today, Naomi talks about her article in Transformative Works and Cultures on fan conventions.

How did you first find out about fandom and fanworks?

My first experience of fandom was in 1995, when I was about 14, and came about because I noticed a sign in a local gift shop. It was advertising a painting demonstration by Clarecraft, a company that made figurines of the characters from Terry Pratchett’s Discworld novels. I’d had been reading these books avidly for a number of years, so of course went along.

The lovely lady I met that day was Isobel Pearson, who alongside her husband Bernard (known to Discworld fans as The Cunning Artificer) founded Clarecraft. She told me they were hosting a fan gathering in the summer at their headquarters in rural Suffolk, and encouraged me to come along. Attending that event was my introduction to Discworld fandom, and led to me attending (and eventually helping run) many conventions and events.

Around the same time, we got our first modem at home and I discovered the internet. I was also a big fan of The X-Files at the time, and found a forum where I made many friends, one of whom introduced me to the concept of fanfiction, and got me interested in the (at that time niche) fandom for Doctor Who. We’re still friends! Read More